Instructional Media


Five Minds for the Future Video Blog
August 11, 2011, 9:08 am
Filed under: EDIM 508

Click here for the link to my video blog on how I will continue to develop my five minds for the future.

Source

Gardner, H. (2007). Five minds for the future. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.



Developing Respectful and Ethical Minds Using Google Earth
August 10, 2011, 10:50 am
Filed under: EDIM 508

As educators, we hope that children begin to develop respectful and ethical minds at home during their earliest levels of development.  In Kindergarten, we begin to foster their respectful and ethical minds through formal instruction of social skills and academics.  My Google Earth virtual field trip of North America has many instructional goals.  Pennsylvania Academic Standards require that Kindergarteners learn about American symbols, such as the American Flag, and that students begin using geographic tools such as maps and globes (PA Standards 5.1.5 and 7.1.1).  The School District of Philadelphia also wants our students to locate the continent of North America on a map, find the United States, and identify the countries that border the U.S.  I integrated all of these concepts into my Google Earth project while also including some Discovery videos and images to reinforce this information.  In order to become respectful and ethical thinkers, we must first understand where and how we live so we can compare and contrast our lives to those of people in other countries.

 I included points in my virtual field trip and in the final activity to encourage discussion as a class about similarities and differences that exist between the three North American countries.  Kindergarteners often see new information at face value and need to be guided towards making connections between their lives and the lifestyles, thoughts, and feelings of other people both in the classroom and as a world focus.  This guidance enables our students to think more respectfully of other people.  My final activity also breaks students into small groups and then pulls the thoughts of the groups into a class discussion.  Working together in groups is another way in which we can teach our students to develop their respectful minds.  There are always contrary opinions on topics and even how to work in a group.  Learning to respect others in a small group setting is a step towards learning to respect others globally.

The ethical mind can take more work with these young students.  Parents and teachers teach children right from wrong and good citizenship.  When trying to understand people of different cultures and backgrounds we need to encourage students to discuss what they are learning and help them reflect.  My virtual field trip provides my Kindergarteners with an introductory sense of where they live in this world and teaches them a little about our country’s neighbors.  This will allow them to further build upon this knowledge on their path towards developing ethical minds as issues arise at home or at school which require a sense of their responsibilities as members of our country’s and our world’s communities.

 Google Earth is a tool that can help our students experience their place and roll as citizens of our planet in order to begin their journeys towards respectful and ethical minds.

Source

Gardner, H. (2007). Five minds for the future. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.



Google Earth Virtual Field Trip
August 10, 2011, 9:21 am
Filed under: EDIM 508

Click here for my Google Earth virtual field trip for Kindergarteners to explore the continent of North America.

Go to the file labeled Kindergarten: North America.

Click here for the sources used to create my virtual field trip.



Using Technology to Foster Respectful and Ethical Minds
August 2, 2011, 1:50 pm
Filed under: EDIM 508

After reading Julene Reed’s online article: “How to create a world of success without leaving your classroom.” I realized that although I am currently assigned to a school that includes children from many cultures, I can still expand their worldview and help make them more respectful and ethical people for the world of tomorrow through technology.  The majority of our students come from a variety of Asian cultures, Hispanic origins, Middle Eastern cultures, as well as native born American children of varied backgrounds.  Our students are already learning about each others’ cultures and building relationships that cross cultural boundaries, but they must still learn to be good citizens and work on “project-based activities” and “collaborate with others” as Reed suggests.  Considering that the majority of my students interact with family and friends outside of the United States, but have very little interaction with students and adults outside of the city of Philadelphia here in America, I’ve decided that I could try to expand their worldview to include students who live in rural or suburban areas of the United States.  I would like to use Skype or another video conferencing platform for my young students to talk with and share their work with students outside of the Philadelphia region, thereby creating “Web Buddies”.  Curriculums are of course different from district to district and state to state, but there is common ground.  Students could discuss their school lives, home lives, show off work to each other, and maybe even work on a collaborative project with their “Web Buddies”.  Howard Gardner tells us in his book Five Minds for the Future that an ethical mind begins at home but is also influenced by the peer group children choose (Gardner, 2007, p. 131 & 133).   By opening our classrooms up to share our students’ experiences with a peer group outside of our schools, we allow them to experience others’ feelings, viewpoints, and experiences which will encourage our students to consider how events and interactions make other people feel and react.  This would allow our students to expand their knowledge of respecting other individuals and teach them to not create opinions of how they perceive people as a group, which according to Gardner makes people more respectful (Gardner, p. 113).  Through these live video interactions, I hope that my Kindergarteners could begin to experience relationships with others as more respectful and ethical young people which will hopefully make them respectful and ethical citizens of the world of the future.

Sources:

Gardner, H. (2007). Five minds for the future. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.

Reed, J. (2011). Global collaboration and learning: how to create a world of success without leaving your classroom. EDTECH: Focus on K-12. Retrieved from http://www.edtechmag.com/k12/events/updates/global-collaboration-and-learning-2.html